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  • Writer's pictureAnna G

My name is Naimah El-Amin. I’m finishing my Associates of Science degree at Cincinnati State this summer, and I’ll be attending University of Cincinnati this fall. This summer I am excited to work in Dr. Ross’s FSCV lab under my mentor Moriah Weese-Myers. Initially, we will study the interactions of estradiol(estrogen/E2)on different carbon-based fiber surfaces via FSCV. To pursue this study, a flow injection cell is used on the different fiber electrodes while injecting E2.The process is monitored and ran through FSCV (Fast Scan Cyclic Voltammetry) which allows us to gain further information on the properties of estradiol, specifically peak potentials when dealing with adsorption or diffusion- what we are measuring. Furthermore, we will investigate scan rate and the role frequency independence has when considering E2’s interaction on these carbon fibers. We hypothesize as the surface of the fiber changes from rough to smooth, less oxidation groups are present making adsorption factors more present. Here, we use FSCV to further study these mechanisms. By advancing the understanding of E2’s interaction at different carbon-based surfaces, we can pave the way for the development of new nanotechnology sensors that are able to better detect estradiol in soft tissues such as the brain. Having the opportunity to work in a professional research environment has offered me priceless experience and skills that I am very grateful for. I am excited to see my progress with my research and gain knowledge as both will help contribute to my future.

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  • Writer's pictureAnna G

My name is Clarissa Flores. I am a rising Junior studying Biochemistry at St. Mary’s University in San Antonio, Texas. This summer, I have been given the privilege to work in Dr. Mack’s lab under my mentor Rohesh Silva. The Mack lab’s research focuses on understanding and conducting solvent-free organic reactions under the innovative, solvent-free technique of mechanochemistry. Within mechanochemistry, we can use a high-velocity ball bearing to pulverize reagents in a Mixer/Shaker Mill or transfer material down a barrel with interlocking screws to be compressed and sheared in a Twin Screw Extruder so that a reaction may occur. Utilizing this novel technique, I am currently investigating radical alkylation of aromatic compounds. Radicals are atoms or molecules that contain an unpaired election. Within radical reactions, highly reactive intermediates are formed and at that point, they may be involved in a variety of chemical reaction processes. Initially, we investigated how/if a primary alkyl halide could undergo these conditions, then transferred our focus to secondary and tertiary radicals. Currently, we are exploring how the use of different activating and deactivating groups operate/effect the reaction in these conditions. The opportunity to work in a graduate chemistry research lab has offered skills and knowledge that go beyond what is available in a classroom, and I am excited to see all that I can learn this summer.

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  • Writer's pictureAnna G

My name is William Franklin. I am studying Chemistry at Lander University. This summer I am excited to work in Dr. Noe Alvarez’s Electrochemistry and Materials Science lab under Bishow Regmi. My project is focused on nanoparticle synthesis that will then be used to develop a monolayer. Atomic Force Microscopy will be used to analyze the nanoparticles synthesized and monolayers formed. This monolayer will be a free-standing film that can be placed on a silicon substrate; this film will ultimately be used to grow carbon nanotubes. A technique involving oil-water interfaces will be implemented to form the free-standing monolayer. The opportunity to work in a graduate chemistry research lab has offered skills and knowledge that go beyond what are available in a classroom, and I am excited to see all that I can learn this summer.

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